Model Question and Answers for APSC | Difference between Crop rotation and interculture/intercropping? Why are they necessary in the present context? (APSC 2011)

Model Question and Answers for APSC | Difference between Crop rotation and interculture/intercropping? Why are they necessary in the present context? (APSC 2011)

Ans : Crop rotation
Crop rotation is a method of rotating different crops in a field across different growing seasons. Yields can be changed every season or after a set number of seasons.
Necessary in the present context
1. There are many reasons why crop rotation is used by farmers the world over. One of the primary reasons is to promote soil health.
2. Different crops need different levels of nutrients from the soil. Tomatoes, for example, take nitrogen from the soil to grow. If tomatoes (or similar crops) are planted in the same field for successive growing seasons, the soil can become unhealthy and nitrogen depleted.
3. On the other hand, Beans are a top producer of nitrogen to the soil when they grow. When you rotate a field between growing these two crops, it helps regulate the soil’s nutrients and keep it healthy and productive.
Interculture/intercropping
1. While similar to crop rotation, intercropping refers to growing different crops in the same area during the same season.

2. Various techniques are used for intercropping, the most common being planting the crops in alternate rows or strips.
3. Of course, because the crops will be growing together, considerations must be made to ensure they will complement each other. For example, one might pair a crop that grows tall with a shorter crop that needs a shaded environment to grow.
Necessary in the present context
1. We don’t want your crops to compete with each other. Because the crops are growing alongside each other, you want to make sure that the vegetables you choose do not negatively affect each other.
2. Many farmers combat this by growing crops with a shorter root system alongside those with a deeper root system, so they aren’t competing for water and nutrients.