Daily Current Affairs (MCQ's) | 18-11-2022

Daily Current Affairs (MCQ's) | 18-11-2022

Daily Current Affairs (MCQ's) | 18-11-2022

Q1. Recently in news the Vikram-suborbital (VKS) is

  1. India’s first rocket built by a private company
  2. India’s first space tourism launch
  3. A spacecraft for India’s experimental landing on venus
  4. Indian rocket launcher for future Indian Space Station

Answer (a)

Explanation:

ISRO to launch the country’s first privately built rocket today

Skyroot Aerospace Mission Prarambh: India's first private rocket, Vikram-S developed by Skyroot Aerospace:

  • The Indian Space Research Organization (Isro) is set to launch the country’s first rocket built by a private company. The private rocket, Vikram-suborbital (VKS), will be launched from Sriharikota, Andhra Pradesh.
  • The VKS rocket has been developed by Hyderabad-based startup Skyroot Aerospace Pvt Ltd and is a single-stage spin-stabilised solid propellant rocket with a mass of approx 545kg.
  • Mission Prarambh, or 'the beginning', will mark the Indian private sector's first foray into the promising space launch market.

 

Q2. Consider the following statements

  1. Karman line is around 100 km above the Earth’s surface
  2. It is considered beginning of outer space

Which of the statements given above is/are incorrect?

  1. 1 only
  2. 2 only
  3. Both 1 and 2
  4. Neither 1 nor 2

Answer (d)

Explanation:

Q3. Consider the following statements

  1. Orbital velocity is the speed that an object must maintain to remain in orbit around a planet.
  2. If a spacecraft reaches a speed of 28,000 km/h or more, instead of falling back to the ground, it will continuously circle around the Earth

Which of the statements given above is/are correct?

  1. 1 only
  2. 2 only
  3. Both 1 and 2
  4. Neither 1 nor 2

Answer (c)

Explanation:

The difference between orbital and suborbital spaceflight:

  • The main difference between orbital and suborbital flight is the speed at which a vehicle is travelling. An orbital spacecraft must achieve what is known as orbital velocity, whereas a suborbital rocket flies at a speed below that.
  • Orbital velocity is the speed that an object must maintain to remain in orbit around a planet.
  • “Suborbital” is a term you’ll be hearing a lot as Richard Branson flies aboard Virgin Galactic’s VSS Unity winged spaceship and Jeff Bezos flies aboard Blue Origin’s New Shepard vehicle to touch the boundary of space and experience a few minutes of weightlessness.
  • If a spacecraft – or anything else, for that matter – reaches a speed of 17,500 mph (28,000 km/h) or more, instead of falling back to the ground, it will continuously circle around the Earth. That continuous circling is what it means to be in orbit and is how satellites and the Moon stay above Earth.
  • Anything that launches to space but does not have sufficient horizontal velocity to stay in space – like these rockets – comes back to Earth and therefore flies a suborbital trajectory.

Suborbital flights (paths A and B) reach space, but because they aren’t moving fast enough over the Earth, gravity will pull the object back to the surface.

 

Q4. Which of the following countries are part of the BASIC group?

  1. India
  2. China
  3. Brazil
  4. South Africa

Select the correct answer using the code given below

  1. 1 and 2 only
  2. 3 and 4 only
  3. 1, 2 and 3 only
  4. 1, 2, 3 and 4

Answer (d)

Explanation:

What is carbon border tax, which India opposed at COP27

  • The BASIC group, comprising India, China, Brazil and South Africa, said in a statement that “unilateral measures and discriminatory practices, such as carbon border taxes, that could result in market distortion and aggravate the trust deficit amongst Parties, must be avoided. ”
  • The Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism is a plan from the European Union (EU) to tax carbon-intensive products, such as iron and steel, cement, fertiliser, aluminium and electricity generation, from 2026.
  • Put simply, the carbon border tax involves imposing an import duty on a product manufactured in a country with more lax climate rules than the one buying it.
  • While its advocates, like the EU, claim the tax will benefit the environment and provide a level playing field to companies, those opposing it call the tax unfair and protectionist. They say it puts the burden of climate compliance on developing countries when historically, they have done much less to pollute the environment and yet are often more vulnerable to the effects of climate change.