Daily Current Affairs (MCQ's) | 09-08-2022

Daily Current Affairs (MCQ's) | 09-08-2022

Daily Current Affairs (MCQ's) | 09-08-2022

Q1.   Contemporaries of this empire described it as the Karnataka Samrajyamu. Modern historians know Karnataka Samrajyamu as

 

  1. Pallava Empire
  2. Chalukyan Empire
  3. Hoysala Empire
  4. Vijayanagara Empire

 

Answer d)

Explanation:

 

  1. While historians use the term Vijayanagara Empire, contemporaries described it as the Karnataka Samrajyamu.
  2. According to tradition and epigraphic evidence two brothers, Harihara and Bukka, founded the Vijayanagara Empire in 1336. This empire included within its fluctuating frontiers peoples who spoke different languages and followed different religious traditions.
  3. On their northern frontier, the Vijayanagara kings competed with contemporary rulers – including the Sultans of the Deccan and the Gajapati rulers of Orissa – for control of the fertile river valleys and the resources generated by lucrative overseas trade. At the same time, the interaction between these states led to the sharing of ideas, especially in the field of The rulers of Vijayanagara borrowed concepts and building techniques which they then developed further

 

Q2. Consider the following statement about the Amara-Nayaka system of the Vijayanagara Empire

 

  1. It has features similar to the Iqta system of the Delhi Sultanate
  2. The Amara-nayakas were nobles appointed as Governors to provinces

Which of the above is/are correct?

  1. 1 only
  2. 2 only
  3. Both 1 and 2
  4. Neither 1 nor 2

 

Answer a)

Explanation:

 

  1. The Amara-Nayaka system was a major political innovation of the Vijayanagara Empire. It is likely that many features of this system were derived from the Iqta system of the Delhi Sultanate.
  2. The Amara-Nayakas were military commanders who were given territories to govern by the Raya. ( Kings in the Vijayanagar Empire adopted the title of the Raya) They collected taxes and other dues from peasants, craftspersons and traders in the area. They retained part of the revenue for personal use and for maintaining a stipulated contingent of horses and elephants. These contingents provided the Vijayanagara kings with an effective fighting force with which they brought the entire southern peninsula under their Some of the revenue was also used for the maintenance of temples and irrigation works.
  3. The Amara-Nayakas sent tribute to the king annually and personally, appeared in the royal court with gifts to express their loyalty. Kings occasionally asserted their control over them by transferring them from one place to However, during the course of the seventeenth century, many of these nayakas established independent kingdoms. This hastened the collapse of the central imperial structure.

 

Q3. Arrange the following events in correct chronological order starting with the earliest

 

  1. Establishment of the Delhi Sultanate
  2. Establishment of the Mughal empire by Babur
  3. Conquest of Goa by the Portuguese
  4. Establishment of the Vijayanagara Empire

Select the correct answer using the code given below:

  1. 1, 2, 4, 3
  2. 1, 4, 2, 3
  3. 1, 4, 3, 2
  4. 4, 1, 2, 3

Answer c)

Explanation:

Q4. Consider the following statement about the Ain-i Akbari

  1. It provided a historical narrative of the Mughal Dynasty
  2. It contains information about the religious, literary and cultural traditions of the people of India
  3. It fails to provide adequate information about the social fabric of India at that time

Which of the above is/are incorrect?

  1. 1 and 2 only
  2. 2 and 3 only
  3. 1 and 3 only
  4. 1, 2 and 3

Answer c)

Explanation

 

  • The Ain-i Akbari was part of a larger project of history writing commissioned by Akbar. This history, known as the Akbar Nama, comprised three books. The first two provided a historical narrative. The Ain-i Akbari, the third book, was organised as a compendium of imperial regulations and a gazetteer of the empire.
  • The Ain gives detailed accounts of the organisation of the court, administration and army, the sources of revenue and the physical layout of the provinces of Akbar’s empire and the literary, cultural and religious traditions of the people. Along with a description of the various departments of Akbar’s government and elaborate descriptions of the various provinces (Subas) of the empire, the Ain gives us intricate quantitative information of those provinces.
  • The Ain is an extraordinary document of its times. By providing fascinating glimpses into the structure and The organisation of the Mughal Empire and by giving us quantitative information about its products and people, Abu’l Fazl achieved a major breakthrough in the tradition of medieval chroniclers who wrote mostly about remarkable political events – wars, conquests, political machinations, and dynastic turmoil.
  • The Ain completely departed from this tradition as it recorded information about the empire and the people of India, and thus constitutes a benchmark for studying India at the turn of the seventeenth century.
  • The value of the Ain’s quantitative evidence is uncontested where the study of agrarian relations is concerned. But it is the information it contains on people, their professions and trades and on the imperial establishment and the grandees of the empire which enables historians to reconstruct the social fabric of India at that time.
  • The above statements make it clear that Ain provided enough information about the social fabric of India.

 

Q5. Consider the following about the Agrarian society during the Mughal Period

  1. Pahi-kashta were residents of the village in which they held their lands
  2. The village headman was known as Muqaddam

Which of the above is/are correct?

  1. 1 only
  2. 2 only
  3. Both 1 and 2
  4. Neither 1 nor 2

 

Answer b)

Explanation

  1. Sources of the seventeenth century refer to two kinds of peasants – khud-kashta and pahi-kashta. The former were residents of the village in which they held their lands.
  2. The latter were non-resident cultivators who belonged to some other village but cultivated lands elsewhere on a contractual basis. People became pahi-kashta either out of choice – for example when terms of revenue in a distant village were more favourable – or out of compulsion – for example, forced by economic distress after a famine.
  3. Though peasants held their lands in individual At the same time, they belonged to a collective village community as far as many aspects of their social existence were concerned. There were three constituents of this community – the cultivators, the panchayat, and the village headman (muqaddam or Mandal).

 

Q6. Consider the following about the mansabdari system of the Mughal

  1. It was a military cum bureaucratic apparatus
  2. It was responsible for looking after the civil and military affairs of the state
  3. Mansabdars were paid only in cash and they were transferred periodically

Which of the above is/are correct?

  1. 1 and 2 only
  2. 2 and 3 only
  3. 1 and 3 only
  4. 1, 2 and 3

 

Answer a)

Explanation

 

  1. The Mughal administrative the system had at its apex a military cum bureaucratic apparatus (mansabdari) which was responsible for looking after the civil and military affairs of the state.
  2. While some mansabdars were paid in cash (Naqdi), the majority of them were paid through assignments of revenue (jagirs) in different regions of the They were transferred periodically.